Act Now! Tell the Senate to Keep Conservation Compliance in the Farm Bill

Farmer and son in front of a tractorYesterday, a conservation milestone was reached. A historic compromise, bringing together agriculture and conservation groups, passed approval in the Senate Agriculture Committee with bipartisan support as the committee finalized their draft of a new five-year Farm Bill.

American Farmland Trust was a leader in brokering the non-partisan conservation compliance agreement included in the draft bill, helping bring together 32 major agriculture, crop insurance and conservation groups to provide a stronger safety net for farmers and for the environment.

The Farm Bill will be voted on by the full Senate in just a few days. Please contact your senators today. Ask them to support the conservation compliance agreement in the Farm Bill.

The timing of your message will be critical to gaining support in the full Senate for conservation compliance. The Senate could meet as early as next week to vote on the Farm Bill. The conservation compliance agreement encourages good conservation stewardship, regardless of the size and scale of the farming operation.

Act now. Tell your senators that conservation compliance is good for the environment and good for farmers.

Fiscal pressures are a reality of the 2013 Farm Bill discussion, but so are sound conservation programs to ensure long-term economic and environmental benefits in agriculture. Don’t let the gains made in the Senate Agriculture Committee be lost. Funding for programs that keep farmers on the land and protect valuable natural resources must be maintained in this Farm Bill.

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  • Random Quote

    “Since 1985, compliance has been a successful part of farm policy. As crop and revenue insurance becomes the core of agriculture’s financial safety net, we need to retain the same commitment to conservation that has been a part of past farm programs.” — Jon Scholl, President, American Farmland Trust